Think Like an Adversary

Consequence-driven Cyber-informed Engineering (CCE) is a new methodology focused on securing the nation’s critical infrastructure systems (CIS). Developed at Idaho National Laboratory, CCE starts with the assumption that if a CIS is targeted by a skilled and determined adversary, the targeted operation can and will be sabotaged.

This approach provides CIS owners, operators, vendors and manufacturers with a disciplined methodology to:

  • Evaluate complex systems.
  • Determine what must be fully safeguarded.
  • Apply proven engineering strategies to isolate and protect an industry’s most critical assets.

Consequence-driven

INL leads executives and operational experts through a series of exercises to identify the most critical functions essential to fulfilling their organization’s mission and determine the potential consequences of a cyberattack against these functions.

Cyber-informed

Using the CCE methodology, INL guides system operators to identify key points within a critical system vulnerable to a cyberattack.

Engineering

INL then fully leverages an organization’s operational expertise, system understanding and process knowledge to engineer out cybersecurity risks.

Safeguarding Critical Infrastructure Operations

CCE Methodology: A Four-Step Process

1. Consequence Prioritization

2. System of Systems Analysis

3. Consequence-Based Targeting

4. Mitigations and Protections

Case Studies

Information

Presentations

Consequence-driven Cyber-informed Engineering Methodology

1. Consequence Prioritization

Sets a clear focus on the risk management framework to select operations that must not fail and associated attack scenarios that could bring them down.

 

2. System of Systems Analysis

Gathers information and identifies the systematic interdependencies between critical processes, defense systems, and enabling or dependent components.

3. Consequence-Based Targeting

Determines the adversary’s path to achieve the highest impact effects, where they need to be to conduct the attack and what information is required to achieve those goals.

4. Mitigations and Protections

Removes or disrupts the digital attack paths as fully as possible.

Information

Through support from multiple federal agencies, we provide a studied and proven methodology of multiple critical infrastructure and national security entities.

Consequence-driven Cyber-informed Engineering Methodology

Engineering out the cyber risk from things that must not fail.

CCE Methodology

1. Consequence Prioritization

Sets a clear focus on the risk management framework to select operations that must not fail and associated attack scenarios that could bring them down.

 

2. System of Systems Analysis

Gathers information and identifies the systematic interdependencies between critical processes, defense systems, and enabling or dependent components.

3. Consequence-Based Targeting

Determines the adversary’s path to achieve the highest impact effects, where they need to be to conduct the attack and what information is required to achieve those goals.

4. Mitigations and Protections

Removes or disrupts the digital attack paths as fully as possible.

Case Studies

Information

Through support from multiple federal agencies, we provide a studied and proven methodology of multiple critical infrastructure and national security entities.

Presentations

Consequence-driven Cyber-informed Engineering Methodology

Engineering out the cyber risk from things that must not fail.

Collaborating Across Critical Infrastructure Sectors

In The News

Consequence Based ICS Risk Management

The End of Cybersecurity

Engineering Out the Cyber-Risk to Protect What Matters Most

Multimedia

CCE — INL’s New Approach to Securing Critical Industrial Infrastructure

CCE with Andy Bochman of INL

Social Media

Twitter

Upcoming Events

ICS Joint Working Group, Salt lake City, UT

Resilience Week 2020, Salt Lake City, UT

Consequence Based ICS Risk Management

Dale talks with Andy Bochman about the Consequence-Driven, Cyber-Informed Engineering (CCE)and John Cusimano about CyberPHA’s. This focus on the consequence side of the risk management is gaining attention. It’s not a replacement for security controls that will reduce likelihood, but it may be more efficient risk reduction than some security controls and lowers the maximum impact of a successful attack.

The End of Cybersecurity

Publication Date: May 31, 2018
Digital, connected systems now permeate virtually every sector of the U.S. economy, and the sophistication and activity of adversaries–most notably nation-states, criminal syndicates, and terrorist groups–has increased enormously.

Engineering Out the Cyber-Risk to Protect What Matters Most

It is dawning on critical infrastructure operators that even the best cyber-hygiene—the sum total of all we now do in cybersecurity—cannot be counted on to keep well-resourced attackers from touching their most critical processes and the systems that support them. This talk will introduce a new approach that draws from engineering first principals to take the highest value targets off the table.

CCE — INL’s New Approach to Securing Critical Industrial Infrastructure

Implementing consequence-driven Cybersecurity with continuous ICS monitoring & threat modeling.

CCE with Andy Bochman of INL

In this podcast, Andy Bochman with INL joins Dale Peterson to discuss their Consequence-Driven, Cyber-Informed Engineering methodology (CCE). It is appealing because it places emphasis on the often neglected consequence part of the risk equation.

Listen to the podcast:

Twitter

The nation’s nuclear energy research laboratory.

ICS Joint Working Group, Salt lake City, UT

Rob Smith, CCE Program Manager, will be discussing CCE applications the the natural gas industry.

ICJSWG 2020 Spring Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, from April 14 –15, 2020. Please share this  information with others who are interested in the ICSJWG and who wish to collaborate with us in our continuing information sharing efforts and dedication to protection of critical infrastructure.

Register here

 

Resilience Week 2020, Salt Lake City, UT

Join us for the Resilience Week 2020 Symposium to discuss how private and public partners can work together to ensure a secure and reliable flow of energy across the nation.

 

In The News

Consequence Based ICS Risk Management

Dale talks with Andy Bochman about the Consequence-Driven, Cyber-Informed Engineering (CCE)and John Cusimano about CyberPHA’s. This focus on the consequence side of the risk management is gaining attention. It’s not a replacement for security controls that will reduce likelihood, but it may be more efficient risk reduction than some security controls and lowers the maximum impact of a successful attack.

The End of Cybersecurity

Publication Date: May 31, 2018
Digital, connected systems now permeate virtually every sector of the U.S. economy, and the sophistication and activity of adversaries–most notably nation-states, criminal syndicates, and terrorist groups–has increased enormously.

Engineering Out the Cyber-Risk to Protect What Matters Most

It is dawning on critical infrastructure operators that even the best cyber-hygiene—the sum total of all we now do in cybersecurity—cannot be counted on to keep well-resourced attackers from touching their most critical processes and the systems that support them. This talk will introduce a new approach that draws from engineering first principals to take the highest value targets off the table.

Multimedia

CCE — INL’s New Approach to Securing Critical Industrial Infrastructure

Implementing consequence-driven Cybersecurity with continuous ICS monitoring & threat modeling.

CCE with Andy Bochman of INL

In this podcast, Andy Bochman with INL joins Dale Peterson to discuss their Consequence-Driven, Cyber-Informed Engineering methodology (CCE). It is appealing because it places emphasis on the often neglected consequence part of the risk equation.

Listen to the podcast:

Social Media

Twitter

The nation’s nuclear energy research laboratory.

Upcoming Events

ICS Joint Working Group, Salt lake City, UT

Rob Smith, CCE Program Manager, will be discussing CCE applications the the natural gas industry.

ICJSWG 2020 Spring Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, from April 14 –15, 2020. Please share this  information with others who are interested in the ICSJWG and who wish to collaborate with us in our continuing information sharing efforts and dedication to protection of critical infrastructure.

Register here

 

Resilience Week 2020, Salt Lake City, UT

Join us for the Resilience Week 2020 Symposium to discuss how private and public partners can work together to ensure a secure and reliable flow of energy across the nation.

 

SHARING ACTIONABLE INFORMATION

Papers

Cyber Threat and Vulnerability Analysis of the U.S. Electric Sector

CCE Mission Support Center Concept Paper

The Need for Cyber-informed Engineering Expertise for Nuclear Research Reactors

Training

ACCELERATE TRAINING

Contacts

The Team

Cyber Threat and Vulnerability Analysis of the U.S. Electric Sector

This paper seeks to illustrate the current cyber-physical landscape of the U.S. electric sector in the context of its vulnerabilities to cyber attacks, the likelihood of cyber attacks, and the impacts cyber events and threat actors can achieve on the power grid. In addition, this paper highlights utility perspectives, perceived challenges, and requests for assistance in addressing cyber threats to the electric sector.

 

CCE Mission Support Center Concept Paper

CCE participants are encouraged to work collaboratively with each other and with key U.S. Government (USG) contributors to establish a coalition, maximizing the positive effect of lessons-learned and further contributing to the protection of critical infrastructure and other national assets.

 

The Need for Cyber-informed Engineering Expertise for Nuclear Research Reactors

This paper examines the need for cyber-informed engineering practices that encompass the entire engineering life cycle. Cyber-informed engineering, as referenced in this paper, is the inclusion of cybersecurity into the engineering process. This paper addresses several attributes of this process and the long-term goal of developing additional cyber-safety basis analysis and trust principles. With a culture of free information-sharing exchanges, and potentially a lack of security expertise, new risk analysis and design methodologies need to be developed to address this rapidly evolving (cyber) threatscape.

 

ACCELERATE TRAINING

A two-day course will provide participants with a fundamental knowledge of the CCE methodology focused on securing the nation’s critical infrastructure systems. Participants should be critical infrastructure owners, operators, vendors, and manufacturers.

Training Flyer

To schedule training, please contact:
Michelle.farrell@inl.gravisdev.com
208-526-5545
National and Homeland Security, Marketing and Engagement

 

Contacts

Cybercore Director

Scott Cramer

Phone: 208-526-2757

Email: scott.cramer@inl.gravisdev.com


Deputy Director of Programs

Rob Helton

Phone: 208-526-6266

Email: robert.helton@inl.gravisdev.com


Senior Grid Strategist

Andy Bochman

Phone: 781-962-6845

Email: andrew.bochman@inl.gravisdev.com


CCE Program Manager

Rob Smith

Phone: 208-526-3881

Email: robert.smith@inl.gravisdev.com


CCE Technical Advisor

Curtis St. Michel

Phone: 208-526-7064

Email: curtis.stmichel@inl.gravisdev.com

Papers

Cyber Threat and Vulnerability Analysis of the U.S. Electric Sector

This paper seeks to illustrate the current cyber-physical landscape of the U.S. electric sector in the context of its vulnerabilities to cyber attacks, the likelihood of cyber attacks, and the impacts cyber events and threat actors can achieve on the power grid. In addition, this paper highlights utility perspectives, perceived challenges, and requests for assistance in addressing cyber threats to the electric sector.

 

CCE Mission Support Center Concept Paper

CCE participants are encouraged to work collaboratively with each other and with key U.S. Government (USG) contributors to establish a coalition, maximizing the positive effect of lessons-learned and further contributing to the protection of critical infrastructure and other national assets.

 

The Need for Cyber-informed Engineering Expertise for Nuclear Research Reactors

This paper examines the need for cyber-informed engineering practices that encompass the entire engineering life cycle. Cyber-informed engineering, as referenced in this paper, is the inclusion of cybersecurity into the engineering process. This paper addresses several attributes of this process and the long-term goal of developing additional cyber-safety basis analysis and trust principles. With a culture of free information-sharing exchanges, and potentially a lack of security expertise, new risk analysis and design methodologies need to be developed to address this rapidly evolving (cyber) threatscape.

 

Training

ACCELERATE TRAINING

A two-day course will provide participants with a fundamental knowledge of the CCE methodology focused on securing the nation’s critical infrastructure systems. Participants should be critical infrastructure owners, operators, vendors, and manufacturers.

Training Flyer

To schedule training, please contact:
Michelle.farrell@inl.gravisdev.com
208-526-5545
National and Homeland Security, Marketing and Engagement